February 2012 Net Worth Update: $141,500 (+1%)


$141, 500 (+1.0%)

Seriously, I have no idea how this happened again but I managed to squeak by (though barely) in positive territory again.  January was brutal and I can see why it is so depressing in January- all the bills to pay!

We still have to pay for our home insurance so I’m sure that will put some sting into my net worth calculations for next month.  What really helped this month is that I got $700 cash back from my MBNA credit card (yes, all from a no fee credit card!).  I have yet to write up a review post for this credit card, but needless to say, my American Express card is back on the back burner (where it really deserves to be since it’s not readily accepted in Canada lol).

Okay, so here’s the breakdown for this month:

ASSETS:

CASH: $12, 700 (+9.3%)

  • More money Pictures, Images and Photos

    Boyfriend and I have a joint account which our mortgage is deducted from, and our own personal accounts.

  • I added up my chequing and savings accounts (High Interest Savings Account). I automatically deduct money from my chequing account and have it siphoned to the HISA account (paying yourself first)
  • I have $2700 saved up for my goal of climbing Mt Kilimanjaro (highest peak in Africa). I’m automatically deducting $100 a month from my bank account into this travel account. I’m about halfway there. Here’s my shameless plug: If you are Canadian and want to help contribute to my hiking fantasy, feel free to sign up for an ING Account with my orange key: 33530953S1. You’ll get $25 if you start an account with $100, and I will get $25 too. :)

STOCKS: $10,186 (+1.04%)

  • The BCE (Bell) holdings I have are doing nicely (pretty much the only thing doing nicely!) and up 39%. Tempted to sell for profit but will hold on for the dividends.
  • I sold my SC.TO (Shoppers Drug Mart) shares just because they really weren’t doing anything.  I’m moving this money into my TFSA account before next month.  It’s on my to-do list.  This would then leave me with $1500 contribution room for my TFSA.
  • These are stocks that capture the “moment in time”, including unrealized gains or losses in my BMO Investorline and Questrade accounts. I added up USD and CAD stocks as “Canadian” money to be simplistic

RRSP: $12,440 (+1.04%)

  • This includes the pre-authorized monthly contribution into my TD E-Series account, a GIC in my ING Direct Account and my new Questrade RRSP account.
  • I am seriously thinking about maxing out my TFSA instead, if I am not able to max out on both (read my TFSA vs RRSP great debate over here) from now on, as I will expect to have defined benefit pension when I retire.
  • I’m not including my defined benefit pension (I didn’t do this for my 2011 net worth updates at all purely due to laziness). Contemplating about whether I should put them back into my networth calculations- what do you think?
  • I owe about $16,000 to myself in my RRSP because I used the Home Buyers Plan for my down payment. I am paying it back by $200 a month. I should probably step it up since at this rate it will take me 6.5 years to pay myself back into my retirement fund!

TFSA: $17, 493 (+1.05%)

  • Most of this portfolio has bounced back nicely, especially my KEG.TO stock- it was down $200 and now up $9 (lol! Don’t forget the $20 gift card for Keg Steakhouse they sent me) and still churning out distributions.
  • Watch out for TFSA over contributions, guys, the CRA will get you for every last penny.
  • I signed up for a Tax Free Trading Account with Questrade in 2009 and haven’t looked back!

CAR:

  • I am not counting this in my net worth, because it’s 11 years old.
  • I am seriously getting some bad luck with this car haha maybe I should stop posting about my expenses on my car here.  Anyways, I got a $35 parking ticket (boourns!!).  Just in case you didn’t know this about me, but I detest ticket officers and tow truck drivers and I can’t help hating them.

PRINCIPLE RESIDENCE: $387,500 (0.0%)

  • I know this it does not make any sense to divide the principle residence and mortgage debt by 50%, but since I cannot disclose my boyfriend’s financial information, I will do it this way to simplify things. Some of you may not agree to that, and I understand.
  • Vancouver is an expensive city to live in, and many people predict that there will be a housing collapse, especially in a place where their is such a disparity between income and housing price. The Vancouver market was actually quite unscathed compared to the depressed housing markets elsewhere, and many people believe it is sorely due for a correction.

LIABILITIES:

Mortgage Debt: $296, 970 (-0.32%)

  • It’s an accelerated bi-weekly payment (-4 years from amortization)
  • We got tenants for our basement suite. Wahoo! BF and I had a long discussion (well heated discussion lol) about paying off our mortgage faster. We have agreed to pay an extra $100 per payment (hence the extra 0.02% HA). I know it’s not much, but it’s a start.

Credit Card: $1828

  • Um this month’s credit card statement was horrid to say the least.
  • I pay off my full amount every month (and folks, it’s VERY important you do so otherwise you’re losing out on a 19% return!) but include it in my net worth update so I have an accurate picture of my actual net worth. I sort of think “If I were to sell everything right now, what would my net worth be?” I guess I shouldn’t put it in the liabilities column since i pay it off regularly, BUT in mint.com it’s under the liability column so I’ll do the same.

About

Young is a writer and former owner of Young and Thrifty and the main "twitter' behind Young and Thrifty's twitter account. She lives in Vancouver, BC and enjoys long walks on the beach, spending time with her anxious dog, and finding good deals. If you like what you read, consider signing up for email updates.

36 Responses to February 2012 Net Worth Update: $141,500 (+1%)

  1. Michelle says:

    Looks like you’re doing good!

  2. Leigh says:

    I gained a TON of my investment losses back – my Roth IRA is *almost* back up to what I put in it – in January, so maybe that helped with your overall growth too?

    Sounds like things are plugging along nicely :) How much longer are you in school for? Was it just this year or next year as well?

    • young says:

      @Leigh- I think it did :) I’m in school for next year as well. I’m enjoying it but this work/life/school balance is a bit off whack. I miss my blog!

  3. Congrats on being positive. I am sorry it was such a brutal month. I love how you equated paying off your CC as getting a 19% return.

  4. A positive attitude is key if you ask me. Good job. Sorry it wasn’t the best month. Don’t worry, good ones will come too.

    • young says:

      @Miss T- Yes I need to keep “The Secret” and the power of positive thinking in mind. It’s so easy to forget to be positive soemtimes (especially for me!).

  5. 1% is quite good. If you can do that every month, you’ll be +12% for the year. :)

  6. Definitely hold onto BCE. That is a classic dividend stock. Asa Brit, I can tell you that I own many of the European telcos which pay quite large dividends. In the States I also own Verizon and AT&T. I’m also looking at Frontier because of its huge dividend, but not sure thats sustainable and/or if it represents weakness in the company. Overall though, telcos are great dividend stocks.

  7. eemusings says:

    Wooohoo!

    I’m curious – what kind of horizon are you looking at with your individual stock buys? Are you looking to sell them once you make a certain profit, or planning to hold them for some years?

    • young says:

      @eemusings- Great question!! I have been experimenting with this myself in the past. With my individual stocks, when I first started investing, I was a “buy and sell” within a few months kind of girl. Now with most of my dividend stocks, I am staying put. Some of the stocks that don’t give out dividends and are “growth” I tend to get rid of (especially if they’re doing bad).

      I learned my lesson to not buy and sell too quickly because I remember buying Visa a few years back for $64 and now it’s over $100. I sold at around $80 but could have made $4000+ lol if I kept it until now. So of course hindsight is 20/20.

  8. Great job! Positive territory is good news!!

    BCE up at 39%? It’s tempting to sell, but I agree with you hold it for the dividends, hopefully rising dividends.

    • young says:

      @Kanwal- Hopefully rising dividends as well, but even if it stays status quo, I’m still happy with my dividend income. I think it’s at around 4-5% or something (I should check).

  9. Every time I read your net work update, I am always inspired!!! I am guessing that I maybe a couple/few years older than you have a net worth of $141K plus. That’s very impressive! I still have a lot of hurtles to jump over to make it there. Keep up the great work!

  10. Nice work

    Even if it is only an extra 100$ (0.02%) towards the mortgage it does matter over the long haul.

    Hope you can get it down even faster

  11. Aloysa says:

    +1% is great! I haven’t looked at our net worth for a while. But I was looking at our debt a lot instead. :) When are you planning to clime Kilimanjaro?

    • young says:

      @Aloysa- Looking at debt is good! I wish we tackled our debt a bit more but it was already kind of like pulling teeth to get my BF to contribute extra to the mortgage LOL. I’m planning to climb it in 2014, so if I save $100 a month I should have enough.

  12. That’s so great that you ended up in the positives even will all those horrid January bills! Great work!

  13. Don’t sell BCE, unless you really need the money. This guy will likely increase their dividend, again this year :)

    Great work. 1% in one month is great. If you can grow your NW by 10-12% per year, that is excellent.

    Keep working hard! You’ll be rewarded!

    Cheers,
    Mark

  14. You got $700 cash back from your MBNA credit card! Wow. I’m not sure if I should say “that’s impressive”, but that is a nice chunk of change. I also use that credit card and have to agree that it’s a great card.

    You keep an good eye on your finances. That’s impressive and inspiring.

  15. Like the others said, it’s on the positive and it’s not always easy. It’s a marathon. Keep up the good work.

    When you are tempted to sell an investment, review it against your plan. Often time, it will re-establish the long term goals and squash short term emotions :)

  16. Geoff says:

    Young- It’s nice to see assets actually appreciate occasionally isn’t it? I’m so used to years of losers that a 1% increase is like a gift from heaven!

    BTW- kudos for having the courage to post income reports. I’m actually terrified to make my own information public…..although, who knows, another couple years of blogging and maybe that will change.

    -Geoff (aka Car Negotiation Coach)

    • young says:

      @Geoff- hey nice to see you! I haven’t seen you around for a while. Yeah, it was a pretty tough anxiety ridden decision but I enjoy snooping at other’s income reports and I think others enjoy snooping at mine. As long as I remain anonymous!

  17. Good work. Keep it flowing! :-)

  18. Big bucks! Nice job on your progress!

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